noble-winged:

Clementine von Radics

noble-winged:

Clementine von Radics

(via clementinevonradics)

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

(via myyounglittlesoul)

monkeysaysficus:

bornite:

Still want to play this.

I am both terrified, and intrigued

monkeysaysficus:

bornite:

Still want to play this.

I am both terrified, and intrigued

(via saltybrinebluestsky)

hansofyoursouthernisles:

whowasntthere:

azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.

What a beautiful photoset of women. Women we don’t often see portrayed in the media, but these are, indeed, women — just as grey-haired men are men.

The fifth one looks like Cameron Diaz

(via middle-women)

wildborscht, now seriously thinking about how little I would mind a picture of a circular phylogeny tree on my body forever

scarletestelle:

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT 

scarletestelle:

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT 

(via middle-women)

next time i typo the word “especially” into “expecially” in a published tumblr post someone throw me off a fucking cliff

Since a three-dimensional object casts a two-dimensional shadow, we should be able to imagine the unknown four-dimensional object whose shadow we are. — Marcel Duchamp (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

(via ichangedmymind)